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Museum of London Docklands presents SWEET TOOTH by Elaine Mitchener

“They will remember that we were sold, but not that we were strong. They will remember that we were bought but not that we were brave.” William Prescott, 1937 (former slave)

The Museum of London Docklands presents SWEET TOOTH by acclaimed vocalist and movement artist Elaine Mitchener on Friday 18 May, 7:30pm. 

This ambitious 50-minute cross-disciplinary music theatre piece uses text, improvisation and movement to stage a dramatic engagement with the brutal realities of slavery as revealed by the historical records of the sugar industry and to reveal its contemporary echoes.

When: Friday 18 May, 7:30pm (doors from 7pm)

Where: 
Museum of London Docklands
No.1 Warehouse
West India Quay
E14 4AL

This event is free of charge however registration is required via Eventbrite.

Bookings: Eventbrite

This special free performance of SWEET TOOTH accompanies the conference ‘Ten Years of London, Sugar & Slavery: Reflections and Responses’

View Full Programme of the Conference: here


The work was premiered in November 2017 at Bluecoat, Liverpool’s centre for the contemporary arts and later broadcast on BBC Radio 3’s Hear and Now programme on 30 December 2017.

“SWEET TOOTH is a vital black British addition to those seminal creative statements of resistance and defiance from the African Diaspora.” Kevin Le Gendre, Jazzwise Magazine

More info and reviews: SWEET TOOTH

Credits:
Concept, Direction & Music: Elaine Mitchener
Movement Direction: Dam Van Huynh
Historical Consultant: Christer Petley
Devised and performed by:
Elaine Mitchener, Sylvia Hallett, Mark Sanders, Jason Yarde

SWEET TOOTH has been supported with public funding from Arts Council England. Commissioned by Bluecoat in partnership with the Stuart Hall Foundation, London and The International Slavery Museum with further support from PRSF Open Fund, Museum of LondonEdge Hill UniversityCentre 151 and St George’s Bloomsbury.

10 April 2018

SWEET TOOTH – Reviews & Interviews

“SWEET TOOTH is a vital black British addition to those seminal creative statements of...