Press

Météo Mulhouse Music Festival
August 27-31, 2019

Ken Waxman

“The soul that should go with funk was offered up with great effect at the Noumatrouff on Météo’s second night when singer Elaine Mitchener and her London-based septet presented what was billed as vocal classics of the avant garde.”

Mitchener and Yarde make moves with Jeanne Lee’s legacy at Kings Place

Kevin Le Gendre

“Mitchener also makes a virtue of this ‘out of many threads one fabric’ aesthetic but, crucially, she brings her own character and idiosyncrasies to bear on Lee’s repertoire.”

‘I am definitely not a jazz singer’

Chris Searle

“Elaine Mitchener is a singer who defies all categories — and that’s the way she likes it, she tells Chris Searle”

Vocal Classics Of The Black Avant Garde – Cafe Oto, London, UK

Bleep x The Wire: The Rolling Calf – Bleep X, London, UK

Biba Kopf

“Digging deep into their own history is exactly the long run up Mitchener and her ensemble need to make their great musical leaps into the future.”

REVIEW: Vocal Classics of the Black Avant-Garde at Cafe Oto

Geoff Winston

“Whereas the originals pushed the envelope of their times and, on listening to recordings where available, still unnerve convincingly, the interpretations presented at Cafe Oto pushed today’s envelope in equally uncomfortable directions as, by implication, they reflected and acknowledged the issues in which society remains deeply mired.”

Mitchener And Yarde Break Blues Boundaries As Black Avant-Garde Comes To Cafe OTO

Kevin Le Gendre

“This gig is a potent, provocative event that underlines the blues as a foundation for progressive black culture”

Classic case of black consciousness raising

Chris Searle

“It’s a marvel that such a small urban space as Cafe Oto, in the hard streets of Dalston, can contain all this music with its profound messages.”

Vocal Classics of the Black Avant-Garde, Café Oto, London — a taste of the age of experimentalism

The band captured the genre-bending energy of the 1960s and 70s

Mike Hobart

“The band captured the genre-bending energy of those times without imitation and added emotional force to the songs presented. (…) Mitchener was a syllable-stretching, sound-crunching force of nature throughout.”