Press

Elaine Mitchener – Solo Throat

Otoroku DL/LP

Daniel Glassman

“unknown tongue” might be the most impressive piece of all. Multitracking her vocals, she conjures up a drama of communication beyond language: her two characters seem to meet, argue, scheme, get frustrated, hit an impasse, muddle through, and finally begin to play and harmonise with each other.

Elaine Mitchener: Solar Throat

Vanessa Ague

Mitchener’s greatest strength on the album is her ability to say a lot with very little. She reminds us that poetry is not just words, it is something to feel deep within the body.

Elaine Mitchener delivers poetry and free jazz in a riotous London show

Mike Hobart

“The first night of performance artist/vocalist Elaine Mitchener’s two-day Cafe Oto residency delivered articulate spoken-word, shapeshifting sonics and intense free jazz.”

British Vocalist Elaine Mitchener Busts it Wide Open on Solo Throat

Peter Margasak

“I wasn’t prepared for the remarkable focus, ingenuity, and invention behind her incredible new album Solo Throat (Otoroku), in which her vast oeuvre of extended techniques, literary inspiration, and improvisational thinking come together into something far more profound and jaw-dropping than the sum of its parts.”

Apartment House’s day of delight, insight and excellence at Wigmore Hall

Christopher Woodley

“Mitchener’s versatility was to the fore in a graphic rendition of the piece, producing a tightly controlled primal scream as she literally found her voice, all aglow with the light of her upper range.”

Change of Future

Stewart Smith

“Pushing boundaries is nothing new for experimental vocalist Elaine Mitchener. Stewart Smith hears how her bold reworking of songs plays an important role in promoting the work of black avant-garde composers.”

Elaine Mitchener/Apartment House, Wigmore Hall, 26 May 2023

Caroline Potter

“Mitchener’s performance was quite simply extraordinary. She held nothing back in her traversal of the enormous vocal range of the work, and her total inhabiting of the character was the enduring memory of the evening.”

IN CONVERSATION WITH ELAINE MITCHENER AND JULIET FRASER

Sophie Emilie Beha

“They are among the most versatile and go-getting singers of our time. Elaine Mitchener deepened her love of singing as a teenager, through gospel music and jazz, and later through classical training at the conservatory. Juliet Fraser did not begin singing seriously until she was 20 years old – until then she wanted to be an oboist. For both, singing was a need, a form of artistic expression, a fulfillment.”

When classical, rock and jazz music all pondered the meaning of England

Philip Clark

“Mitchener inhabited King George’s fracturing identities with an unsettling intensity.”